On the hunt

Many Cross Creek students take to the woods and lakes for fish and game

Senior Tripp James with some of the wild turkeys he has shot

Photo Provided

Senior Tripp James with some of the wild turkeys he has shot

Alysia Williams, Staff Writer

For junior Kayla Shull, hunting is more than a sport. It is a good way to bond with her family.

“Hunting runs in my family,” Kayla said. “It’s an activity that all my family has taken pride in.”

Kayla is not alone.

Many students at Cross Creek enjoy following the family tradition of hunting, whether it be for deer, duck , pheasant , or boar.

Another student who loves to hunt is senior, Tripp James. Tripp enjoys getting outdoors and experiencing the thrill of the hunt.

”I feel that hunting gives me a sense of nature,” Tripp said. “It gives me the set of skills I need to feed my family.”

Tripp takes pride in hunting.  He has taken his share of wild turkeys.

It (hunting) gives me the set of skills I need to feed my family.”

— Tripp James

When times are hard it’s convenient to know that families have an alternative to food and survival. It is not just their families that benefit from the kill. Many entrepreneurs run a business based on the meat that was hunted. These people process the kill into different styles of foods. There are a large variety of meats to choose from.

The kill can be processed into many different styles of meat. For instance, the meat can be turned into beef jerky, sausage, ground meat, chops, etc.

All in all, hunting is more than just killing animals or as a hobby. It is used as a rite of passage, family bonding, therapeutic measures, a sport and also as charity.

“I love to be able to give food to other people even after I have already stocked up my fridge for the year,” said freshman, Dalton Sapp.