Students learn about dressing for success

JGG presentation gives tips for getting that job

Sarina Wilkerson, left, and Charisma Hunt of Cato Fashion, give students an idea of what to wear to a job interview

Staff Photo

Sarina Wilkerson, left, and Charisma Hunt of Cato Fashion, give students an idea of what to wear to a job interview

Brian Neill, The Tusk Adviser

Students got a first-hand lesson in dressing for success from various professionals at a special presentation Wednesday.

“Dress for Success,” sponsored by Jobs for Georgia Graduates, featured guest speaker Kimberly Scott, co-anchor at WJBF NewsChannel 6.

Scott told those in the audience that the way they dress, above all else, will have the most impact on whether they get hired or not.

“When you think, ‘Why would they assume I’m this way or that way,’ think about what you have on,” Scott said. “It’s unfortunate, but they read you by what you wear.”

Even the little things matter, Scott said.

Kimberly Scott, co-anchor for WJBF NewsChannel 6, speaks to students about dressing for success.
Staff Photo
Kimberly Scott, co-anchor for WJBF NewsChannel 6, speaks to students about dressing for success.

“You know how you can get ahead of the game when you go in for an interview? Pull your pants up, tuck your shirt in,” Scott said. “You’re already ahead of the game.”

Scott said students should also think about the people with whom they associate.

If the people students hang out with typically get in trouble or do drugs, then those students are going to be associated with that activity, Scott said.

Also speaking at the event were Charisma Hunt and Sarina Wilkerson of Cato Fashions, who brought clothing displays to give students ideas on how to dress for interviews.

“Your personality and your attire is everything when you go into a job interview,” said Wilkerson.

Hunt gave girls several tests to determine if they were dressed appropriately for an interview.

For instance, if a girl puts her hands down to her sides and her skirt is shorter than her middle finger, it’s too short, Hunt said.

Hunt also recommended a white, button-down shirt that could be either dressed up or down with accessories, depending on the job for which one is applying.

Shoulder straps should be at least three fingers wide, Hunt added.

“You don’t want to have your cleavage out,” Hunt said. “You want to have a nice neck line. You don’t want your bra showing. You don’t want to dress for the club.”

Wilkerson also had special advice for students with tattoos.

“If you have a tattoo, always make sure you cover it up,” she said. “Jobs are very, very picky. They don’t play with that.”