Time to get rid of cellphone rule

Lunch is students' time; phones should be allowed

Anijah+Gordon+thinks+the+cell+phone+law+is+too+strict
Back to Article
Back to Article

Time to get rid of cellphone rule

Anijah Gordon thinks the cell phone law is too strict

Anijah Gordon thinks the cell phone law is too strict

Staff Photo

Anijah Gordon thinks the cell phone law is too strict

Staff Photo

Staff Photo

Anijah Gordon thinks the cell phone law is too strict

Anijah Gordon, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Have you ever been in lunch and wished that you could take your phone out?

It’s time that Cross Creek gets rid of the banning of cellphones during lunch.

After all, lunch is when students take a break from everything and relax.There are no teachers present during the lunch period, so why aren’t students allowed take their phones out?

I understand that it is a different case in the classes and in the hallway because it can cause distractions and also conflicts.

Many students believe that if they are allowed to use their phones, it will cut down the conflict rate because everyone is busy on their phone, minding their own business and has less time to get in arguments.

“There is nothing harmful about being on your phone at lunch,” senior Kynisha Robinson said, “It keeps people more occupied and keeps them more focused on themselves than others.”

At the end of the day, both sides win because the teachers and principals would have limited problems to deal with.

As students, we deserve a break from all the learning we do daily. Besides the only bad thing we can do with it is post the gross lunch that we get on Instagram or Facebook.

School administrators say it’s just a matter of following the district’s rules.

“It causes too much distraction,” said Dr. Moore, “I didn’t make the rules about phones and it all goes back to the rule book.”

Mr. Smith was asked to give his opinion on technology being allowed at lunch. He said that phones are not allowed, period, in school unless it is BYOT (bring your own technology).

“Rule 1:  no cell phones allowed in school,” Smith said. “The technology should not be brought into the school at any cost.  It’s like (if) the speed limit is 50, you can drive 45 if you wanna, but if you drive 55 you’re speeding.”

The opinions expressed in editorials are not necessarily those of Cross Creek High School, its administration, or The Tusk.