Suicide and Depression? “That’s stupid, just get over it.”

Experts say more attention needs to be paid to teen depression

Suicide and Depression?

Special

Valerie Saunders, Staff Writer

Talking to multiple students around the school, one realizes that many are dealing with or know someone who has been impacted by depression.  Often people with depression aren’t noticed, because they hide it, or put on a mask.

The Tusk  spoke to multiple students around the school, on condition of anonymity to talk about the topic of depression.

Here is what they said:

“You know how you’ll get in a mood and you really don’t know what’s wrong but it’s something but you can’t name it?” said one junior. “That’s what it is when depression hits.”

“Depression is like being deep in your thoughts, kind of like… Being in a bottomless pool of water and not being able to escape from your thoughts or anxiety,” said a sophomore. “It’s like you’re drowning in everything and you can’t take the pain anymore and just want it to end. To die.”

A senior said. “When I think of depression I think of all the suicidal people in the world. All the people going through rough times. All the people who get told they don’t have it that bad, that they need to get over it.

“All the people who are tired and stressed and just want to get it all done and over with. So many people have depression these days and many don’t even realize it. Some people instead of killing themselves, self-harm. I know at least five people personally who go here who self harm. And to hear people make jokes about killing themselves and cutting themselves is just disgusting. Suicide and  self-harm isn’t a joke. Many people don’t realize how serious it is and the people who do realize that  are just as enraged as I am of these ‘jokes.’ ”

It’s like you’re drowning in everything and you can’t take the pain anymore and just want it to end. To die”

— A Cross Creek sophomore

“It’s hard to put into words,” said a freshman. “This nagging thought at the back of your mind that whenever you get happy, it just starts telling you no, you’re not good enough, you’re worthless.”
Experts say many people do not truly realize how many people deal with depression. One in eight adolescents deal with major depression, according to the  Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. 

So one in every eight students have depression.

There are more than 1,300 students at our school, meaning as many as 162 of them suffer from major depression.

Experts say more attention needs to be brought to this issue.